HomeAbout our FirmClient ServicesTax FormsTax, Accounting, Assurance NewslettersTools and CalculatorsLinks to Useful WebsitesContact Us
Tax, Accounting, Assurance Newsletters
Tax Alerts


The Federal Government proposed a number of changes to the taxation of Employee Stock Options in their March 4, 2010 budget. On August 27th the government released the draft legislation to implement their proposals. In our view the income tax rules for Employee Stock Options have always been somewhat problematic and often created tremendously punitive and arguably unfair results. These new rules alleviate some of the old tax problems, but have at the same time have introduced new cash flow challenges for companies and individuals. Below are our comments on some of the major aspects of the proposed changes.

When the Canada Pension Plan was put in place on January 1,1966, it was a relatively simple retirement savings model. Working Canadians started making contributions to the CPP when they turned 18 years of age and continued making those contributions throughout their working life. Those who had contributed could start receiving CPP on retirement, usually at the age of 65. Once an individual was receiving retirement benefits, he or she was not required (or allowed) to make further contributions to the CPP. The CPP retirement benefit for which that individual was eligible therefore could not increase (except for inflationary increases) after that point.


For all but a very fortunate few, buying a home means having to obtain financing for the portion of the purchase price not covered by a down payment. For most buyers, especially first-time buyers, that means taking out a conventional mortgage from a financial institution.


The month of September marks both the end of summer and the beginning of the new school year for millions of Canadian children, teenagers, and young adults. And, whatever the age of the student or the grade level to which he or she is returning, there will inevitably be costs which must be incurred in relation to the return to school. Those costs can range from a few hundred dollars for school supplies for grade school and high school students to thousands (or tens of thousands) of dollars for the cost of post-secondary or professional education.


The administrative policy of the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) with respect to charities has been that no more than 10% of a registered charity’s resources can be allocated to non-partisan political activity. Where the CRA views a charity as having exceeded that threshold it may impose sanctions, up to and including revocation of a charity’s charitable registration status.


Two quarterly newsletters have been added—one dealing with personal issues, and one dealing with corporate issues.


HomeAbout our FirmClient ServicesTax FormsTax, Accounting, Assurance NewslettersTools and CalculatorsLinks to Useful WebsitesContact Us